Cobblestone streets

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Cobblestone streets

Post by Norm Dresne » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 10:07:07



I found cobblestone street material in the Walters catalog from Busch,
Faller, Kibri, and Volmer.   I probably don't have a hobby shop nearby that
carries any of these so I was hoping to solicit comments from experienced
modelers.

    Thanks
        Norm

 
 
 

Cobblestone streets

Post by Other Bria » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 10:55:46


I have material from two manufacturers, I believe one was Kibri, the other
was from Plastruct, though I'm not sure that it is marketed as cobblestones.
I ended up using blue polystyrene insulation board "etched" with a fine
point papermate ball point pen.  I didn't like the uniform height of the
plastic sheet, and though a bit tedious, preferred the irregular surface
that was easily created with the foam.  I sanded the surface first, etched
the seams into the foam, coated with acrylic artists paste, sprayed with
dullcoat (to seal the ink from the pen and keep it from bleeding through),
and painted. Using the foam also allowed me to easily reproduce the changes
in topography and the sunken lanes of the roadway.

This probably doesn't help with respect to your application, but it was the
route that I ended up taking.

Brian


Quote:> I found cobblestone street material in the Walters catalog from Busch,
> Faller, Kibri, and Volmer.   I probably don't have a hobby shop nearby
that
> carries any of these so I was hoping to solicit comments from experienced
> modelers.

>     Thanks
>         Norm


 
 
 

Cobblestone streets

Post by Wolf Kirchmei » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 10:28:04



>I ended up using blue polystyrene insulation board "etched" with a fine
>point papermate ball point pen. ..snip the rest....

Did you do this by eye, or did you use a ruler, or what? I ask because
although cobbles aren't perfectly regular, but they are laid in rows.

Also did you simulate rounded cobbles, or the square "setts" that are
sometimes called cobbles?

--
Wolf Kirchmeir
try emailing me at wolfkirATsympaticoDOTca

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Cobblestone streets

Post by Ctyclss » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 12:17:31


I've used the Kibri cobblestone sheets to make a wide street on our display
layout. I think it looks fairly decent and apparently so do others because we
routinely get questions about how it was made. Trouble is, the stuff starts to
get expensive if you're making a street of any length.

Jim

 
 
 

Cobblestone streets

Post by Andrew Cock » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 12:40:55



Quote:>I've used the Kibri cobblestone sheets to make a wide street on our display
>layout. I think it looks fairly decent and apparently so do others because we
>routinely get questions about how it was made. Trouble is, the stuff starts to
>get expensive if you're making a street of any length.

>Jim

What many of us cheapskates do for a large cobble street is to make a
press. Basically carve a 1" by (road width) piece of plasticine into
the cobble pattern. Bend it to a gentle curve and surround with lego.
Fill with plaster. Voila a press tool. Spread modelling clay (Das) on
the road surface, sprinkle with talc, and emboss with the plaster
press tool using a rocking motion. Easy and cheap cobbles.

Andrew

 
 
 

Cobblestone streets

Post by Other Bria » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 20:09:09




> >I ended up using blue polystyrene insulation board "etched" with a fine
> >point papermate ball point pen. ..snip the rest....

> Did you do this by eye, or did you use a ruler, or what? I ask because
> although cobbles aren't perfectly regular, but they are laid in rows.

> Also did you simulate rounded cobbles, or the square "setts" that are
> sometimes called cobbles?

I laid out the basic widths of the roads and walkways with a series of ink
dots indicating corners, bends, and about every 10 inches or so on straight
runs.

There were two distinct different stone shapes, one being generally
roundish, and then there were  some areas that appeared to have later added
drainage/gutter areas mostly with  rectangular stones.  The rows of
rectangular stones were indicated with dots from the pen, but otherwise they
were done by eyeball to maintain the random appearance.  Another feature of
the town was that there were sidewalk areas separated from the street by 3-4
feet wide stri[ps of grass in some places, looked very attractive.  The town
was in France, and I had a combination of contemporary photos along with
some from the 1930's.  I can't for the life of me remember the name of the
town at this point (it's been about 13 years ago).

I've also used strips of the blue foam cut up on the band saw to create
stone structures with good effect.  I use artist's acrylic paint and
materials and glue the foam together using artist's matte medium and
straight pins (until dry).  A pen and an x-acto make nice stones, and I've
also made small presses with styrene for repetitive patterns.  It really
works fast and looks pretty convincing, though wouldn't work well for things
like brick in small scale.  For larger Irregular stone and cut stone
foundations it is neat.  You can also build up thin layers to recreate fancy
masonry.

Brian

 
 
 

Cobblestone streets

Post by Dan L. Merke » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 22:28:40




> >I've used the Kibri cobblestone sheets to make a wide street on our display
> >layout. I think it looks fairly decent and apparently so do others because we
> >routinely get questions about how it was made. Trouble is, the stuff starts to
> >get expensive if you're making a street of any length.

> >Jim

> What many of us cheapskates do for a large cobble street is to make a
> press. Basically carve a 1" by (road width) piece of plasticine into
> the cobble pattern. Bend it to a gentle curve and surround with lego.
> Fill with plaster. Voila a press tool. Spread modelling clay (Das) on
> the road surface, sprinkle with talc, and emboss with the plaster
> press tool using a rocking motion. Easy and cheap cobbles.

> Andrew

Could you do the same with the blue foam and a piece of the pre-formed
plastic?

dlm
--
Dan L. Merkel
bright.net-BRT

===== > >  Your Local Link to the Internet in
                              Findlay and in Hancock County  < < =====

 
 
 

Cobblestone streets

Post by Dan L. Merke » Wed, 24 Apr 2002 22:26:55



> I found cobblestone street material in the Walters catalog from Busch,
> Faller, Kibri, and Volmer.   I probably don't have a hobby shop nearby that
> carries any of these so I was hoping to solicit comments from experienced
> modelers.

>     Thanks
>         Norm

Just a thought... we have a linoleum floor in our kitchen that has a
very fine pebble pattern in it... the "stones" are only about 1/8 of an
inch.  I'm just wondering if one could use that flooring painted an
appropriate color and get by with a reasonable cobblestone street?

One other thing that I did is pretty simple as well.... I wanted some
brick streets, so I got some old Walthers building paper in brick and
just used it for my brick street.  It looks pretty good and was super
easy to lay.  With today's graphics programs and computers, you could
almost create your own custom pieces for the sections that you would
need to cover your streets... just a thought...

dlm
--
Dan L. Merkel
bright.net-BRT

===== > >  Your Local Link to the Internet in
                              Findlay and in Hancock County  < < =====

 
 
 

Cobblestone streets

Post by Andrew Cock » Thu, 25 Apr 2002 07:34:59


On Tue, 23 Apr 2002 09:28:40 -0400, "Dan L. Merkel"




>> >I've used the Kibri cobblestone sheets to make a wide street on our display
>> >layout. I think it looks fairly decent and apparently so do others because we
>> >routinely get questions about how it was made. Trouble is, the stuff starts to
>> >get expensive if you're making a street of any length.

>> >Jim

>> What many of us cheapskates do for a large cobble street is to make a
>> press. Basically carve a 1" by (road width) piece of plasticine into
>> the cobble pattern. Bend it to a gentle curve and surround with lego.
>> Fill with plaster. Voila a press tool. Spread modelling clay (Das) on
>> the road surface, sprinkle with talc, and emboss with the plaster
>> press tool using a rocking motion. Easy and cheap cobbles.

>> Andrew

>Could you do the same with the blue foam and a piece of the pre-formed
>plastic?

>dlm
>--
>Dan L. Merkel
>bright.net-BRT

Hmmm, never thought of that. One problem I can see is that blue foam
tends to return to its natural state after a while. Any embossing that
didn't break the surface would gradually fade away.

It should be possible to make a master tool using plasticard and
microstrip. The real key though is to make the master curved so that
it is rocked back and forth to create the embossing. If its flat any
low spots in the surface wouldn't get the pattern.  A Curved embosser
also allows you to control the pressure better by going over the
surface a number of times as needed.

A

 
 
 

Cobblestone streets

Post by Other Bria » Thu, 25 Apr 2002 08:25:14



> On Tue, 23 Apr 2002 09:28:40 -0400, "Dan L. Merkel"

> >Could you do the same with the blue foam and a piece of the pre-formed
> >plastic?

> >dlm
> >--
> >Dan L. Merkel
> >bright.net-BRT

> Hmmm, never thought of that. One problem I can see is that blue foam
> tends to return to its natural state after a while. Any embossing that
> didn't break the surface would gradually fade away.

> It should be possible to make a master tool using plasticard and
> microstrip. The real key though is to make the master curved so that
> it is rocked back and forth to create the embossing. If its flat any
> low spots in the surface wouldn't get the pattern.  A Curved embosser
> also allows you to control the pressure better by going over the
> surface a number of times as needed.

I should have mentioned, I never use the smooth glazed surface of the blue
foam; I always sand it off before applying a pattern, because it does spring
back and takes paint badly.   When using strips of the foam for building
walls, I cut it up on a band saw, and discard the pieces that have the
glazed surface.

When using presses, (I never thought to make them curved, good idea) I
always make them flat and applied the pattern by rolling a piece of larger
diameter PVC pipe or a rolling pin over them.

Brian

 
 
 

Cobblestone streets

Post by Todd » Thu, 25 Apr 2002 15:30:03


Hi Norm,

I have used the concrete system they have and it worked great.  I liked how
it made the contours of the street so that they are not perfectly flat.  If
you want to check it out and see how it looks, go to
http://www.zone0ne.com/trains and check out the photos.

Good luck,

Todd


Quote:> I found cobblestone street material in the Walters catalog from Busch,
> Faller, Kibri, and Volmer.   I probably don't have a hobby shop nearby
that
> carries any of these so I was hoping to solicit comments from experienced
> modelers.

>     Thanks
>         Norm

 
 
 

Cobblestone streets

Post by Brian G. Muelle » Fri, 26 Apr 2002 17:50:41



Quote:> Hi Norm,

> I have used the concrete system they have and it worked great.  I liked
how
> it made the contours of the street so that they are not perfectly flat.
If
> you want to check it out and see how it looks, go to
> http://www.zone0ne.com/trains and check out the photos.

> Good luck,

> Todd

Hi Todd,

That's an awesome layout!  I am a beginner and trying to get all the ideas I
can.  I loved reading about your experience with DCC.  The more I consider
it, the better it sounds!  It looks like you loop around for continuous
operation, is that true?  The detailing is incredible, too!

I can't say enough about how nice your layout looks, and I have gathered
some good ideas from your plan, myself!

BGM